North Carolina residents who work for relatively large companies may want to know about the results of one international study. This study analyzed over 100,000 Oregon-based organizations and traced their survival during a period of 25 years. In the end, researchers were able to determine that companies that faced workers’ compensation claims were 56% more likely to survive than companies that did not.

The greater likelihood of survival, by which is meant ongoing operations even when the owners change, was seen among companies with more than 100 employees whereas companies with fewer than 30 employees saw no difference either way. In other words, the larger and more established a company is, the more profitable it is to ignore worker safety, pay out the fines for safety violations and deal with the claims arising from injuries.

Researchers were not able to explain why facing workers’ compensation claims leads to greater survival than not facing them. They believe new regulations should be set up, though, that encourage employers to find innovative ways for improving safety and productivity at the same time. Without this incentive, many business owners will only continue to put profits above their workers. Meanwhile, small business owners who want to improve safety may not have the resources to do so.

Regardless of what employers do to maintain a safe workplace, employees who are injured on the job can pursue a workers’ compensation case. Of course, they may face opposition from their employer if the employee was in any way to blame for their injuries, which is why it may be a good idea to see a lawyer for advice and guidance. A successful claim might provide wage replacement and cover all medical expenses. Victims may be reimbursed for their temporary or permanent disability.