If you or someone you love was hurt while walking in Goldsboro, North Carolina, then there’s a good chance of being able to file a claim against the driver. Sometimes, pedestrians are at least partially to blame, which can complicate matters.

One thing to know is that the number of pedestrian accidents on America’s roads is far from going down. On the contrary, it has been consistently increasing since 2009. The year 2019 was no different.

GHSA on pedestrian deaths in 2019

Though the 2019 data is still incomplete, the Governors Highway Safety Administration was able to take it and estimate that there were 6,590 pedestrians who died that year. This number is 5% higher than it was in 2018. Moreover, it represents a 60% jump from 2009 and the highest total since 1988.

Georgia, Florida, Texas, Arizona and California accounted for 47% of these fatalities. Incidentally, these five states together make up 33% of the U.S. population. As for those states with the highest pedestrian fatality rate, they were Florida, New Mexico and Hawaii. The lowest were in Vermont, Wisconsin and Idaho.

More SUVs and drivers who use their phones

All other traffic deaths, according to the GHSA, saw a 2% increase between 2009 and 2019. There’s obviously more than one reason for this trend in pedestrian fatalities, and the GHSA report gives several.

One is that more and more of the new vehicles that are being purchased (69% in 2019 as opposed to 48% in 2009) are light trucks, especially SUVs. These vehicles are especially deadly in pedestrian accidents. Another factor is the greater number of drivers who feel that it’s fine to use their phone behind the wheel.

A lawyer to help you through tough times

Personal injury claims arising out of pedestrian accidents can be hard to argue alone, so victims may want legal representation. A lawyer may give you the personal attention you need for your case while you focus on coping with your injuries. The lawyer may negotiate for a settlement covering all legitimate losses like medical expenses, lost wages and pain and suffering.